Courses for
Villanova University Vatican Internship Program
in cooperation with The College of Global Studies

Important Notes

  • All Villanova University Vatican Internship students are required, in addition to the internship placement, to take an Italian Language course as well as the Rome Core Course. The Italian language course will be taught on Friday morning. Beginning Italian language students will start with Elementary Italian, while Advanced students will take a placement exam. Elective courses may be chosen from the Arcadia in Rome courses or from the University Course Selection List taught by Università degli Studi Roma Tre or AUCIS faculty. All courses are held on Università degli Studi Roma Tre campus. Maps to courses and block scheduling with respective classroom location will be made available at the academic orientation of your program.
  • Courses (other than introductory Italian) are 3 credits.
  • IMPORTANT: students enrolled in courses at Università degli Studi Roma Tre will be beholden to the university schedule and may not be able to observe all semester breaks foreseen by the Arcadia in Rome calendar.
Students enrolling in Università degli Studi Roma Tre courses must check the university calendar with Arcadia in Rome's Academic Coordinator before scheduling personal travel and events.

Arts Courses

ROMA AHMH 320 Museum Practices in Rome: the History of Collecting and Exhibiting Works of Art
ROMA ARRB 310 From Rome to Baghdad: Change and Continuity in the Ancient Mediterranean
ROMA ENRW 350 Reading and Writing Rome
ROMA ESSU 360 Sustainability: A Simple Thing That Is Hard To Do
ROMA HSIT 330 Italian Crossroads: Immigration and its Consequences
ROMA HSHR 310 Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.  Human Rights in Historical Perspective
ROMA PSLH 360 Italian Political and Legal History since 1946
ROMA RMML 350 At Home in Rome: Modern Life in the Eternal City
ROMA SOCI 310 Italy: The Economics of Organized Crime and Social Innovation
ROMA SOIT 310 Food and its Visual Representations. Food Between Sin and Art: from Trimalchio's Supper to Babette's Feast and to Contemporary Slow Food Culture
ROMA THPR 310 Performance in Rome/Rome as Performance

 


Business Courses

ROMA IBUS 300 Fundamentals of International Business 
ROMA IBUS 302 International Finance 
ROMA MGMT 353 Principles of Organizational Theory, Behavior, and Management
ROMA MKTG 300 Principles of Marketing


Arts Courses

ROMA AHMH 320 Museum Practices in Rome: the History of Collecting and Exhibiting Works of Art

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

Collecting is one of the most common attitudes of human nature. However, what happens when the individual instinct of collecting materials gains an institutional aspect and becomes part of a public exhibition?

Course focuses on the history of collecting and the conservation of cultural heritage, on collecting itself as a process, and on the nature of collections as part of our effort to construct an intelligible world view. From the attitude of the private collector to the birth of the public museums, the topics will be analyzed in relation to anthropological, social, historical and artistic context. Due to its extremely diverse panorama of galleries, public collections and temporary exhibitions, Rome makes a perfect case study for analyzing museum work.

Through lectures, class discussions, fieldtrips and visits, readings, films and individual research projects, students will have the opportunity not only to explore Rome's cultural life but also to see the issue of collecting both as an anthropological question and as a very topical matter of national identity.

top


ROMA ARRB 310: From Rome to Baghdad: Change and Continuity in the Ancient Mediterranean

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

This course intends to reconstruct the historical and cultural processes that transformed dramatically the Mediterranean world from the later Roman age to the early Arabic period (3rd-8th cent. AD). This reconstruction will be based upon archaeological and literary evidence. It will give the students an insight in the complexity of the developments that re-shaped the political, religious, economic and cultural relations in the region, with particular regard for the events in Italy, Constantinople, Northern Africa and the Near East. The role of the rulers (emperors, kings, caliphs), the elite and the clergy in the shaping of the new Mediterranean will be highlighted. The course will further explore the effects of the forced cohabitation between Romans, Germanic populations, Byzantines and Arabs in the new order of the Mediterranean world. Special attention will also be given to the major urban centres and the way they interacted with the surrounding countryside.

Every week a different aspect of this transformation will be discussed in a class lecture followed by a site visit in Rome in which the impact of the changes in Italy and the Mediterranean on the old capital of the Roman Empire will be investigated. A weekend trip to Ravenna, capital of the Western Roman Empire, of the Germanic kingdom of Italy and of the Byzantine territories in Italy is also scheduled.

top


ROMA ENRW 350: Reading and Writing Rome

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

"All roads lead to Rome," for writers especially: course focuses on classical and contemporary works by authors for whom Rome has figured largely in their personal, aesthetic, and intellectual development. Through readings, lectures, discussions, workshops and site-visits, students will understand these canonical, and formulate their own, literary responses to Rome.

top


ROMA ESSU 360 Sustainability: A Simple Thing That Is Hard To Do

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

"Sustainable" and "Sustainability" have become very fashionable words, to be used in any possible context. As always in such cases, the widespread adoption of words presents positive and negative aspects. On the positive side, it means that a greatly appreciable concern for our future is creeping into mainstream thinking. On the negative side, words can became screens, behind which to hide one's lack of real interest and decision, lip service, that is.

According to Brundtland (1987) "sustainable development is meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs". But long before that, Thomas Jefferson (1789) had stated a very similar concept: "Then I say the earth belongs to each … generation during its course, fully and in its own right, no generation can contract debts greater than may be paid during the course of its own existence". Or, paraphrasing the Holy Book, "do unto future generations that which you would have them do unto you". Finally, "A community is unsustainable if it consumes resources faster than they can be renewed, produces more wastes than natural systems can process or relies upon distant sources for its basic needs" (Sustainable Community Roundtable Report; www.olywa.net/roundtable, 2005).

Thus, the concept is quite simple. Its implementation, though, appears extremely difficult (hence, quoting Bertolt Brecht, the subtitle of this course).

top


ROMA HSIT 330 Italian Crossroads: Immigration and its Consequences

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

Course concentrates on Italy's recent history as a mass immigration country since 1970s. Through lectures, class discussions, fieldtrips, readings and films, students explore effects of globalization on migrations to Italy and Italian society's responses. Examines racism, segregation and exploitation, 'second generations' and artistic, literary and economic contributions of immigrants.

top


ROMA HSHR 310 Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. Human Rights in Historical Perspective

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

The underlying goal of this course is for students to understand that the acknowledgement of rights and freedoms that are nowadays commonly called “human rights” is the concrete result of the intellectual debate of the Enlightenment legal-philosophical movement of the 18th century. Students will develop a foundational knowledge on right(s) to life (focus on death penalty and torture) and right(s) to liberty (focus on slavery, freedom of thought, expression and belief).

The first part of the course will be devoted to the analysis of the historical background of the concept of “human rights” starting from the condemnation of torture and death penalty in 18th century Italy and the influence of Jusnaturalism and Enlightenment on the American and the French Revolutions.

The second part of the course will deepen the contemporary development of the concept of “human rights” after WWII with particular reference to the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), the Italian Constitution (1948), the European Convention of Human Rights (1953) and the latest anthropological studies on cultural relativism (especially in Asia).

Although there is an evident chronological gap between the two parts of the course, they are very strictly connected from a logical point of view: The ideas developed during the Enlightenment have, as a matter of fact, directly influenced the contemporary declarations of human rights, which are still in force.

top


ROMA PSLH 360: Italian Political and Legal History since 1946

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

The aim of the course is to give to the students a complete overview of the political history of Italy, starting from the end of WWII, with a particular focus on some legal/political events that can be considered crucial to understand today's Italy. The course will provide the students with the tools necessary to critically analyze legal-political topics (and stereotypes).

top


ROMA RMML 350: At Home in Rome: Modern Life in the Eternal City*

*This is a Core Course required of all AUCIS program participants.

Credits: 3

(view complete syllabus)

Course focuses on complexities of contemporary life and culture in Rome: changing populations and identities, challenges of adapting to global economy, organizing life around ancient monuments and public spaces. Through lectures, class discussions, fieldtrips, readings, films, and individual research projects, students explore city's cultural life and own reactions to it. Course aims to break down stereotypes, raise cultural awareness and enhance students' cultural acumen for future.

top


ROMA SOCI 310: Italy: The Economics of Organized Crime and Social Innovation

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

Encyclopedia Britannica describes Italy as "less a single nation than a collection of culturally related points in an uncommonly pleasing setting."

Through a series of vignettes, this course will illustrate those phenomena which at times isolate and at others unify the regions of Italy. While attempting to define a collective identity of contemporary Italy, students are forced to look beyond the Italy they encounter daily and required to delve into the broad spectrum of contemporary Italian society and culture. While it connects with personal experience, the course demands the development of a critical approach and informed opinions.

top


ROMA SOIT 310 Food and its Visual Representations. Food Between Sin and Art: from Trimalchio's Supper to Babette's Feast and to Contemporary Slow Food Culture

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

Starting from a visual and historical approach, the matter of food and cuisine is examined through selected literary examples and their correspondent filming.The aim of the course is not only to make an historical survey of food, but also to give a reading of some representations of food, in the social context of the 'neo-Latin' area (as the course starts from the Rome of the 1st Century and involves mainly Italy and France).

Through lectures, class discussions, fieldtrips and visits, readings, films and individual research projects, students will have the opportunity not only to explore an important aspect of Rome's local culture, but also to be aware of 'cultural identities', seen through the opposition to or the acquisition of different models.

top


ROMA THPR 310 Performance in Rome/Rome as Performance

Credits: 4

(view complete syllabus)

Course analyses the city space as a site of collective participation to national events that shaped cultural and political traits, while at once constructing the image of Italy known to foreign spectators. Examining the theoretical framework of culture through class discussions, short performances and fieldtrips, students will be introduced to the reading of specific geographic sites, traditional folk beliefs, and cultural products to deepen their understanding of Italy's complex characteristics.

top


Business Courses

ROMA IBUS 300:  Fundamentals of International Business


(based on the course taught at the Kogod School of Business, American University)
(View full syllabus)

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of at least one undergraduate semester course in economics. 

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the international environment in which firms operate, and how this environment impacts firms' decisions. To gain such an understanding, this course will cover topics such as the nature and scope of international trade and investment, the role of international institutions, how the international monetary system and exchange markets function, and some of the major issues involved in the functional aspects of international business. Obviously, the current condition in Italy will constitute frequent examples.

Managers engaged in international business must understand the economic, political and social environments of business and learn to manage in risky and often uncertain conditions. In addition, they must work with employees, suppliers and partners from around the world who often have widely-differing expectations and capabilities. Simultaneously, they must innovate, learn and outpace competitors. Clearly, understanding all of the macro- and micro-factors involved in international business is no small task. This course introduces all of these factors, and is intended to help students develop an understanding of the fundamentals of international business.

top 


ROMA IBUS 302:  International Finance


(based on the course taught at the Kogod School of Business, American University)
(View full syllabus)

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of at least one undergraduate semester course in economics. 

The International Finance course is analytical in nature and requires solid quantitative skills. It introduces the student to topics of international corporate financial and investment management. The course presents the financial theories and quantitative tools necessary for making international financial decisions.  Extensive coverage is given to the topics of (1) various types of risk exposures involved in international business and types of instruments for global risk management; (2) operations of foreign exchange, international banking and money, international bond, and international equity markets; and (3) financing and investment decisions that multinational firms face in the real world.  The course helps develop the skills necessary to function as an international financial manager.  The course will make use of the program's unique setting in Italy and the European Union.

top 


ROMA MGMT 353:  Principles of Organizational Theory, Behavior, and Management 


(based on the course taught at the Kogod School of Business, American University) 
(view full syllabus)

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of at least one undergraduate semester course in business and economics. 

This course deals broadly with the human aspects of organizations, focusing on the individual, group/interpersonal, and organizational dimensions of management.  Beyond simply developing a new vocabulary about organizational life and acquiring knowledge of management theories, research and practices, this course is about skill development (the application of knowledge to real life).  Through a variety of experiences, which may include simulations, case analyses, interviews, questionnaires, and discussions, students will develop a better understanding of themselves, others, and the socio-technical systems of organizations.  This course has been designated as team-intensive. This course is considered a survey course, and it will include material that is applicable not only to the United States, but also to Italy and the European Union.

top 


ROMA MKTG 300:  Principles of Marketing


(based on the course taught at the Kogod School of Business, American University) 
(view full syllabus)

 

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of at least one undergraduate semester course in economics. 

This course focuses on the role of marketing in business and non-profit organizations. The course emphasizes basic marketing principles, and it provides a framework for understanding how these concepts are implemented.  Global and high-technology perspectives are offered throughout the course.  Case studies, articles, and videos will be presented to students, and students will analyze the information presented and will offer solutions. A major component of the course is preparation of a brand analysis paper.  The goal of this assignment is to enable students to conduct an analysis of a brand's marketing and communication strategy.  The assignment requires students to demonstrate their written communication skills and knowedge of concepts presented in this course. Examples will be chosen from products available in Italy and the European Union.

top