Arcadia London Course Descriptions


Anthropology/Religion

LONS ANRS 199 Enchanted City: Religious Experience in Secular London

(view complete syllabus)

We tend to think of cities like London as exemplary sites of Western philosophical and political traditions of secularism; these traditions have insisted on the separation between state and religion and the allocation of spiritual experience and practice in the private domain. In reality, however, life in London entails, for many of its citizens, a constant – and sometimes tense – public negotiation of secular citizenship with deeply embedded and heavily invested religious affiliations. Through an overview of religious experience in London, this course interrogates the ways in which spiritual experience impacts the urban landscape, conversations on policy, the evolving life of communities and understandings of identity. Besides engaging with World Religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and so on) the course offers the opportunity for a wider exploration of spirituality, including involvement in magical cults.

The course will be structured around seminar discussions focused on key readings and visual material but it will also include a fieldwork component

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Art History/Art

LONS ARLC 103 London: City of Art

(view complete syllabus)

This course will trace the history of displaying, selling and curating art in London from the eighteenth-century to the present day. We will explore the development of the art museum in the capital, from the first purpose-build gallery in Dulwich, to the ambitious museum complex at South Kensington, to the reclaimed industrial halls of Tate Modern. We will also explore the connections between art and money in the city, from Hogarth’s fund-raising efforts for the Foundling Hospital to the emergence of the mega art-fair, Frieze and the all-powerful private collectors, such as Charles Saatchi. We will also examine the status of Britain’s national collection and national museums, and ask ‘who owns the best art?’ We will look at the way that museums and exhibitions have shaped British Art History and the way we have learned to look at art, from the National Gallery, to Roger Fry’s Post-Impressionist exhibitions in the 1910s and Sensation! – the show that marked the arrival of the YBAs onto the British art scene in the 1990s. We will consider the impact of British politics on London’s cultural landscape and how the recent cuts to arts funding might impact museum culture and British art making in the years to come.

The course will be taught through seminars and field trips to relevant museums and galleries, using London’s extensive art collections as our primary resource. Our visits will be combined with the close reading of art historical texts and film screenings, as well as specialized tours and discussions with curators

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LONS AREC 180 Environment, Communities and the Arts in London

(view complete syllabus)

This course is an intensive study of the way environmental and community arts in Great Britain have responded to a growing awareness of the inevitable changes resulting from global warming, environmental degradation and energy use that question current social, artistic, political and economic thinking.  This course looks at the emergence of new ways of living and thinking about transport, cities, land use and food growing.

The structure of the class involves informal lectures, seminars, discussions, film extracts and field trips.

Students will be directed to many internet sites and will need to use these to link, explore and research course themes, always crediting and fully referencing sources.

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LONS ARDP 190 Contemporary Photography Practice

(view complete syllabus)

The course aims to give students a basic introduction to photography practice and theory, particularly those practices and theories developed in an age of digital photography. They will learn how they can use their own equipment to its full potential by exploring photographic culture, camera technique, postproduction and creative application. Gallery visits, seminars, walkabouts, one to one tuition and sketchbook work will also be used to help students contextualize their own experiences of London through the medium of photography.

The course will culminate in an exhibit of student’s work at the London Study Centre.

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LONS ARUS 382 Urban Space: Modern City (Not available in Fall 2014) 

(view complete syllabus)

Through a combination of city walks, building visits and seminar sessions this course studies the urban fabric of London, from its reconstruction after the Great Fire in 1666 to the present day. The course provides a historic and social mapping of the city through first hand encounters with buildings and urban space. We will explore different types of building – from historic churches to contemporary shopping malls, from theatres to housing – and reflect on issues regarding the provision and use of public space within the city.

The course addresses the city and architecture through interdisciplinary approaches, incorporating elements of architectural history, social geography, art practice and cinematography. The course explores the broad social and economic forces behind the evolution of London’s built environment, and also discusses the role of the architect in shaping the spaces of the city, both inside and out. The city will be used as a context for research, explored through the use of different recording techniques, including photography, video and sound.

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Business

LONS ECON 109 Introduction to Microeconomics

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This course seeks to provide a foundation in microeconomic analysis for students who have not had much previous exposure to economics. Emphasis will be placed on applied issues in economics and public policy, particularly as they relate to Great Britain and Europe more generally.

Weekly lectures and seminars will focus on how microeconomic theory is often at the heart of both policy decisions and everyday life—from questions over the National Health Service (NHS) or European tax proposals to consumer behavior and the public good. By using the basic techniques of microeconomics, students will be able to follow current policy debates intelligibly and understand the relevant issues and complications from an analytical standpoint.

Additional attendance at lectures or seminar series taking place during the semester in London may also be required.

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LONS BUFC 213 Finance and the City

(view complete syllabus)

The City of London, encompassing just one square mile, is England’s smallest ceremonial county. However, despite – or perhaps because of – its size, it perfectly embodies the power and reach of global finance. This course is designed to explicate the workings of global finance through the history and institutions of the City of London. In more detail, it will examine the relationship between finance capital and international trade and investment, the nature and functioning of the capital markets, and the key actors and interests within the sector. All analyses are framed within the wider economic, political and social context. Capitalizing on the proximity of the City of London, the course includes class excursions to London’s major economic and financial institutions, including the Bank of England.

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LONS BUUK 390 Marketing in the UK Environment

(view complete syllabus)

This course introduces students to the importance of marketing as a philosophy of business, and to the tools of marketing to provide solutions to business problems. Examples will be drawn from the United Kingdom and the Single European Market in particular.

The course starts with an overview of marketing as a concept and its development. It then deals with the marketing environment, the concept of a product and the product life cycle and pricing in the market mix.

Marketing research is related to consumer behavior, communications and promotional activities. Discussion of distribution issues leads to a consideration of the factors affecting choice of distribution channels. The importance of a structured approach to new product development is explored through consideration of sources of new product ideas, development and testing and market testing.

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Communications

LONS JPLN 110 Journalism: News and Feature Writing

(view complete syllabus)

This hands-on class teaches students how to write clear, accurate and engaging newspaper and magazine articles. Workshops simulating a newsroom environment encourage them to explore newsgathering, news writing, feature writing, researching, interviewing, and discuss ethical issues. The course introduces students to a diverse range of UK publications, including broadsheets, tabloids and magazine supplements in print and online. Students critically assess the material and identify the different styles, values and approaches taken by different publications. They explore the fundamentals of practical journalism, including using English effectively and developing editing and proofreading skills. They learn how to find story ideas, research them and turn them into compelling stories. The skills learned in this class are relevant for print and online journalism, but are also useful for those working on in-house newsletters, reports or wanting to develop their general written communication skills.

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Creative Writing

LONS EEWL 107 Writing London

(view complete syllabus)

London has been the home and inspiration of many of the best writers working in the English language for centuries. Although these writers often publish in a variety of literary forms, this course will focus on their career as essayists. The essay is widely considered to be a dying art, and yet it is one of the main forms of student evaluation in the humanities and social sciences. We will therefore use these great writers as guides to developing vibrant and coherent written work, while simultaneously learning how the city of London has been portrayed by thinkers old and new, from Thomas de Quincey to Zadie Smith.

This course offers a wonderful opportunity to refine your writing; portions of each seminar will be dedicated to the craft of composition. Students will gain practice both analyzing the best contemporary essayists and undertaking exercises designed to improve technique. In addition, field trips to the sites that captured the imaginations of these acclaimed writers will bring London alive as a city of words. As Samuel Johnson wrote: “The happiness of London is not to be conceived but by those who have been in it”. During this course there will be class visits by writers whose work reflects the many-sided personality of the capital, and students will obtain invaluable skills in written expression that will serve them for the rest of their careers.

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LONS ENCW 210 Creative Writing - The Art of Fiction

(view complete syllabus)

Students will be encouraged to develop their own creative writing within the context of contemporary British fiction. We will analyze the approaches taken by various British novelists and short story writers. Our focus will be decidedly practical as we learn to read as writers, gleaning tips on the craft of constructing prose fiction. The course will invite students to consider the issues raised in the process of writing, aiming to uncover various methods of confronting potential problems. Our textual analysis will provide a springboard for our own writing. Students will develop their own imagination, self-criticism and craft through a combination of structured creative writing exercises and independent assignments.

By the end of the course, each class member will have collected a portfolio of work. The program will end with a literary event, at which each student will have the opportunity to read a selection of his/her work.

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Drama and Theatre

LONS DTSH 180 Introduction to Shakespeare in Text and Performance

(view complete syllabus

The aim of the course is to provide students with a means of approaching Shakespeare by introducing them to the themes and ideas that dominated his dramatic art throughout his career. Although this is an introductory course, it is not a survey course. It is a detailed study of six representative texts that are placed in both a modern and Elizabethan social, cultural and theatrical context. Wide use is made of available recordings, films and stage productions.

A combination of lectures, tutorials and seminars enables students to approach the material in a variety of ways. Lectures cover background and social and theatrical material as well as Shakespeare's biography. In general, the tutorials emphasize close textual study and the discussion of the relevance of these plays to the 20th century.

Instruction is delivered through Lectures, discussions and theatre visits.

Students must be prepared to pay for the required trips and theatre tickets.

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LONS DTPC 181 The London Stage in Text and Performance

(view complete syllabus

The course is centered on theatre productions, with the emphasis on new writing, established theatre companies as well as one of the main subsidized institutions, the National Theatre. This allows you to see some new and innovative work as well as more traditional classic revivals.

Our focus each week will be analyzing plays in performance. The aim is to learn how to read plays critically as well as for performance. Some sessions are dedicated to student group presentations, where you will apply the work to your own analysis of productions viewed this term. These student presentations are based upon the theatre productions we see this term. This teaches you to consider your role as a member of the audience, to develop a constructive critical approach and to test out your ideas in debate.

At every lecture you are expected to have a copy of every play text, Stephen Unwin’s book and the course reader. It is important that you become familiar with the world of which the theatre is a part. You should therefore try to watch relevant television programs, read newspapers regularly, concentrating especially upon feature articles about the arts generally and specifically theatre reviews.

Throughout the semester, you may be given copies of articles about the theatre and reviews of the production seen.

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Film and Media Studies

LONS MSHP 142 Introduction to British Media: Media, History and Public Policy

(view complete syllabus)

This course introduces students to the study of British media with an emphasis on learning how to reflect on and analyze a variety of media texts, from print and television news to feature length‐documentaries. The course offers a historical survey of key moments in the development of British media (covering print, radio, television, new media, etc.) as well as an introduction to a range of scholarly writings that take up various debates on the topic.

Key areas explored include:

  • Main theoretical approaches in media studies
  • Introduction to the study of media policy
  • Media effects and influence
  • Media and politics
  • Media texts and representation (race, gender, sexuality, class and age)
  • Media and culture

LONS MSFC 210 Filming the City

(view complete syllabus)

This course examines the key themes of contemporary urban British cinema. There is a special focus on how British cinema has tackled questions of national identity, and also authorship case studies on celebrated British directors Mike Leigh and Ken Loach..

Topics include:

  • Cinema and society
  • Cinematic representation
  • Narrative and genre

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Health

LONS HISM 300 Medicine in the UK: Medieval Mysticism to Modern Socialized Medicine

(view complete syllabus)

To understand how healthcare is delivered and healthcare systems are developed, you must examine the political, economic, and cultural context during the times the policy was developed. This course offers a survey into the history of medicine in the UK from medieval times through the establishment of socialized medical system. Students will be asked to reflect on the how urbanization, scientific advancements and public health initiatives, contributed to the development of a government funded health service. They will analyze the socioeconomic factors at play during critical times of healthcare advancement and visit historical sites associated with medical science advances in London and reflect on locations and their contribution to the medical system as it stands today. Students will investigate the NHS systems hands on by shadowing care providers in different sectors of the NHS. Students will compare socialized medicine to privatized medicine and investigate the social, political, and economic factors associated with each system. Students will investigate current “hot topics” associated with public health and public policy as it relates to changes in the National Health System.

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History

LONS PSPT 240 Politics of Protest 1640 to the Present (Not available in Fall 2014)

(view complete syllabus)

Look in any paper and you will see that the world has grown tired of politicians. Everywhere new forms of protest are appearing. From the rise of Anonymous, to Wikileaks, to Occupy and the Arab Spring populations are reinventing the way we protest when authority seems to be ignoring us. In recent years there has been an overwhelming feeling that traditional politics have failed and that ideas such as environmentalism and anarchism might be the answer, realigning the concept of left and right inherited from the French Revolution and exemplified by the Cold War. Much of modern protest is decided by new media, but much still takes place on the streets.

How do people make their voices heard? What are the origins of ideas of people's democracy, social democracy and personal freedom and what role does the organized political party play in revolutionary protest? Starting in the 1640s, in England, with people like John Lilburne and the Levellers and Gerard Winstanley and his proto-communists, the course will explore the ideas of republicanism, anarchism, Marxism, environmentalism, anti-imperialism and fascism in a global context using film, novels, pamphlets, speakers and outings to understand the origins and formation of current contemporary alternative politics. This course explores the ways that ordinary people have fought for freedom and equality.

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LONS HIEC 273 Issues in British Imperialism: 1800 to Present Day

(syllabus forthcoming)

The British Empire was the largest the world has ever seen, encompassing one quarter of the globe. Partly because of empire, Britain became the first industrial nation in the world and retained its global supremacy for a century and a half. Yet, in a period of some twenty years after the Second World War the British Empire was broken up and only small fragments remain today. These remarkable events have left an enormous impression on both Britain and the rest of the world: one only has to examine the roots of current conflicts in the Middle East and South Asia today to see these imperial legacies, but they are also present in more positive forms of global trade, migration and investment, the spread of international sports, representative democratic institutions, and of the English language. This course does not attempt to provide a complete outline of the rise and fall of the British Empire, rather it focuses on key issues of controversy relating to the empire and its legacies. It takes into account the multi-disciplinary contributions that have been made to understanding empire, particularly in looking at post-colonial perspectives and at the cultural impact of empire both at home and in the colonies. The final section will focus on the impact of the empire on British society and identity, both in its heyday and in the post-colonial era. There will be special attention paid to the legacy of Commonwealth migration to Britain since 1948 and the impact this has had on Britain’s development as a multicultural country, and on its sense of national identity.

During the course, we will take advantage of our London location to visit two museums and an area of London with a large British South Asian community to examine the issues at first hand.

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LONS HISM 300 Medicine in the UK: Medieval Mysticism to Modern Socialized Medicine

(view complete syllabus)

To understand how healthcare is delivered and healthcare systems are developed, you must examine the political, economic, and cultural context during the times the policy was developed. This course offers a survey into the history of medicine in the UK from medieval times through the establishment of socialized medical system. Students will be asked to reflect on the how urbanization, scientific advancements and public health initiatives, contributed to the development of a government funded health service. They will analyze the socioeconomic factors at play during critical times of healthcare advancement and visit historical sites associated with medical science advances in London and reflect on locations and their contribution to the medical system as it stands today. Students will investigate the NHS systems hands on by shadowing care providers in different sectors of the NHS. Students will compare socialized medicine to privatized medicine and investigate the social, political, and economic factors associated with each system. Students will investigate current “hot topics” associated with public health and public policy as it relates to changes in the National Health System.

top


Journalism

LONS JPLN 110 Journalism: News and Feature Writing

(view complete syllabus)

This hands-on class teaches students how to write clear, accurate and engaging newspaper and magazine articles. Workshops simulating a newsroom environment encourage them to explore newsgathering, news writing, feature writing, researching, interviewing, and discuss ethical issues. The course introduces students to a diverse range of UK publications, including broadsheets, tabloids and magazine supplements in print and online. Students critically assess the material and identify the different styles, values and approaches taken by different publications. They explore the fundamentals of practical journalism, including using English effectively and developing editing and proofreading skills. They learn how to find story ideas, research them and turn them into compelling stories. The skills learned in this class are relevant for print and online journalism, but are also useful for those working on in-house newsletters, reports or wanting to develop their general written communication skills.

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Literature

LONS LIUK 120 The London Novel

(view complete syllabus)

An introduction to contemporary literature by writers (male and female, British and non-British) who have used London as location and as controlling metaphor.

The course will be based on lectures, student-led seminars, and group discussion, as well as (wherever possible) a visit from the writer studied that week. We shall also watch film of interviews of writers and of dramatic versions of their work. Each student is expected to be responsible for one class presentation during the semester, but this may take the form, if desired, of an interview of the visiting writer. (Therefore at one point during the semester each student will have a special, individual deadline.) We shall take one or two field trips to examine selected London locations.

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LONS LISG 320 Sex, Gender and the City

(view complete syllabus)

Contemporary London is a vibrant world city with a range of overlapping and divergent subcultures. Like all cities, it has its own erotics and its own sexual spatial politics. From the swinging 60s to the present, this course examines contemporary literary London through the lens of sexuality, teasing out different representations of the city and its varied people and exploring a range of topics in contemporary gender and sexuality studies. Among the themes we’ll consider are: the impact of feminism and 1960s sexual liberation; the impact of AIDS and the politics of sexuality in the 1980s; the ways ethnic communities are challenged by shifting notions of sex and gender; the crisis of masculinity in the 1990s. Authors we study include Edna O'Brien, Neil Bartlett, Sarah Waters, Hanif Kureishi and Martin Amis. We'll supplement our reading by viewing films (e.g. Antonioni's Blow Up and Kureishi's My Beautiful Launderette) and we'll visit London's Tate Modern, and consider gender and sexuality as it figures in contemporary urban British art (for instance, the work of Tracey Emin and Grayson Perry).

There will be film screenings of London films such as Stephen Frears’ My Beautiful Laundrette (with a screenplay by Hanif Kureishi) and Prick Up Your Ears. As these films are integral to knowledge of the sexuality of London and its citizens these screenings will be compulsory events.

There will also be a trip to the Tate Britain and/or the Tate Modern and commercial galleries in the East End where students will be encouraged to consider gender and in contemporary British urban art, for instance, the work of Tracey Emin and Grayson Perry. Students will be expected to bring along pen and paper to write down, or sketch, their responses. This activity will also be compulsory.

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Political Science

LONS PSPT 240 Politics of Protest 1640 to the Present (Not available in Fall 2014)

(view complete syllabus)

Look in any paper and you will see that the world has grown tired of politicians. Everywhere new forms of protest are appearing. From the rise of Anonymous, to Wikileaks, to Occupy and the Arab Spring populations are reinventing the way we protest when authority seems to be ignoring us. In recent years there has been an overwhelming feeling that traditional politics have failed and that ideas such as environmentalism and anarchism might be the answer, realigning the concept of left and right inherited from the French Revolution and exemplified by the Cold War. Much of modern protest is decided by new media, but much still takes place on the streets.

How do people make their voices heard? What are the origins of ideas of people's democracy, social democracy and personal freedom and what role does the organized political party play in revolutionary protest? Starting in the 1640s, in England, with people like John Lilburne and the Levellers and Gerard Winstanley and his proto-communists, the course will explore the ideas of republicanism, anarchism, Marxism, environmentalism, anti-imperialism and fascism in a global context using film, novels, pamphlets, speakers and outings to understand the origins and formation of current contemporary alternative politics. This course explores the ways that ordinary people have fought for freedom and equality.

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LONS PSUK 251 Britain and the EU

(view complete syllabus)

This course examines processes of political change in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century through to the present. It assesses the challenges Britain faced as a result of the twin processes of welfare and warfare and the ideological and policy changes, which these pressures produced. The twin conjunctures of the 1930s/40s and 1970s/1980s will be given special attention as decisive moments in the re-ordering of British social and political life and the way the changes related to Britain’s sense of itself as a country coming to terms with the perception of decline and the existence of other and potentially disruptive models of modernity. The course involves lectures, seminars, films and field trips.

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LONS HIRP 350 Developing Economies: Social, Political and Economic Change

(view complete syllabus)

Over the past two decades developing countries (DCs) have become increasingly significant in issues and debates in international relations, global business and geopolitics. This module aims to provide students with an integrated understanding of social, political and economic change in DCs and its interconnections with the wider world. Drawing on approaches from international political economy and comparative political sociology, it will provide in-depth analyses of the relations between DCs and advanced capitalist countries (ACCs), important trends within the developing world, and the major development-related issues of the 21st century.

In order to pursue a rounded appreciation of the discipline, the module combines both lecture and seminar formats within one full session. At the end of each full session, students will be provided with a set of questions based on the information imparted in both lecture and seminar. These are to be answered after class and prior to the following session, using the notes taken in the lecture and exercises completed in the seminar. In addition, hard copies of selected readings – from investment bank reports to academic articles – will be provided at the end of the session to further facilitate the answering of these questions. It is imperative that the questions are answered – they will form the basis of the module’s notes and will be critical to passing the mid-term exam and the end-of-semester assignment.

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Sociology

LONS SOSC 143 Introduction to Sociology

(view complete syllabus)

This course provides a survey of major ‘classical’ and ‘contemporary’ sociological paradigms, theories and thinkers. As such this course will cover a time span from the 1830s to the present. Sociology is a field of study that explains social, political, and economic phenomena in terms of social structures, social forces, and group relations. It introduces you to the field by focusing on several important sociological topics, including class, religion, conflict, bureaucracy, socialization, culture, the social construction of knowledge, inequality, race and gender relations. To the extent possible, we will place thinkers and their contributions to the field in their historical and intellectual contexts and focus on the analytical assumptions and implications of each individual theoretical approach. Sociological theories are an effort to make the social world around us understandable and, as such, they also have empirical implications. We will explore both how to grasp the internal logic of the theories and how that theory applies to real social processes, both in the past and in the present. While the lectures will provide an overview of the most important aspects relating to the study of society, seminars will give students the opportunity to investigate specific issues in more depth and give them the possibility to apply what they have learned from the reading and the lecture in class discussions.

This course will be taught in the format of weekly lectures (1.5 hrs.) and seminars (2 hrs.)

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LONS AREC 180 Environment, Communities and the Arts in London

(view complete syllabus)

This course is an intensive study of the way environmental and community arts in Great Britain have responded to a growing awareness of the inevitable changes resulting from global warming, environmental degradation and energy use that question current social, artistic, political and economic thinking. This course looks at the emergence of new ways of living and thinking about transport, cities, land use and food growing.

The structure of the class involves informal lectures, seminars, discussions, film extracts and field trips.

Students will be directed to many internet sites and will need to use these to link, explore and research course themes, always crediting and fully referencing sources.

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LONS SOGL 212 The Making of Global London: Migration and Identity

(view complete syllabus)

London in the early 21st century can claim to be the locus of the greatest degree of human diversity on earth. Over 300 languages are spoken in the city by its residents, who now comprise almost every ethnic, racial and religious group on earth. The “super-­‐diverse” and multi-­‐cultural nature of London is a matter of highly contested political and academic debate with an “immigrationist” narrative arguing that migration has been a constant in the city’s history over many centuries and that the wealth and culture of the city is built on immigrant roots. As the pace of demographic change has risen significantly in the years since 1997 a counter viewpoint that questions the veracity and proportionality of “immigrationist” narrative has emerged to question to the challenge the desirability and viability of continuing mass migration to London and the UK as a whole. Growing political resistance to migration within the population is lending increasing weight to political parties and movements that oppose mass migration and the UK relationship to the European Union.

Other ideas and research in genetics, however, suggests that human identity is more hybridized and polyglot that tradition conceptions of “national” or “ethnic” identity might assume. Intensifying trends in communications, technology and the mass movement of human beings across the planet suggest a third possibility: that London as a leading metropolis is at the forefront of a new trend in human civilization: the emergence of the “global city”.

This course will explore the evolution of London from the capital city of a nation - state into the global city it is seen as today. Commencing with a deconstruction of the British “national” identity, students will examine the respective academic and political discourses that attach different levels of significance to the role of migration and diversity towards the history of London. Moving further into the course, students will seek to comprehend the scale of diversity represented in London today and the impact of rapid demographic change on traditional notions of citizenship and identity.

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Urban and Architectural Studies

LONS LISG 320 Sex, Gender and the City

(view complete syllabus)

Contemporary London is a vibrant world city with a range of overlapping and divergent subcultures. Like all cities, it has its own erotics and its own sexual spatial politics. From the swinging 60s to the present, this course examines contemporary literary London through the lens of sexuality, teasing out different representations of the city and its varied people and exploring a range of topics in contemporary gender and sexuality studies. Among the themes we’ll consider are: the impact of feminism and 1960s sexual liberation; the impact of AIDS and the politics of sexuality in the 1980s; the ways ethnic communities are challenged by shifting notions of sex and gender; the crisis of masculinity in the 1990s. Authors we study include Edna O'Brien, Neil Bartlett, Sarah Waters, Hanif Kureishi and Martin Amis. We'll supplement our reading by viewing films (e.g. Antonioni's Blow Up and Kureishi's My Beautiful Launderette) and we'll visit London's Tate Modern, and consider gender and sexuality as it figures in contemporary urban British art (for instance, the work of Tracey Emin and Grayson Perry).

There will be film screenings of London films such as Stephen Frears’ My Beautiful Laundrette (with a screenplay by Hanif Kureishi) and Prick Up Your Ears. As these films are integral to knowledge of the sexuality of London and its citizens these screenings will be compulsory events.

There will also be a trip to the Tate Britain and/or the Tate Modern and commercial galleries in the East End where students will be encouraged to consider gender and in contemporary British urban art, for instance, the work of Tracey Emin and Grayson Perry. Students will be expected to bring along pen and paper to write down, or sketch, their responses. This activity will also be compulsory.

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LONS ARUS 382 Urban Space: Modern City (Not available in Fall 2014)

(view complete syllabus)

Through a combination of city walks, building visits and seminar sessions this course studies the urban fabric of London, from its reconstruction after the Great Fire in 1666 to the present day. The course provides a historic and social mapping of the city through first hand encounters with buildings and urban space. We will explore different types of building – from historic churches to contemporary shopping malls, from theatres to housing – and reflect on issues regarding the provision and use of public space within the city.

The course addresses the city and architecture through interdisciplinary approaches, incorporating elements of architectural history, social geography, art practice and cinematography. The course explores the broad social and economic forces behind the evolution of London’s built environment, and also discusses the role of the architect in shaping the spaces of the city, both inside and out. The city will be used as a context for research, explored through the use of different recording techniques, including photography, video and sound.

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London Internship Students Only

LONI INPR 310 Work in Thought and Action

(view complete syllabus)

Combining approximately 150 - 200 hours of work placement experience with seminar discussions and a research paper this course enables students to explore the dynamic between their academic knowledge and the application of that knowledge in the work place. Situating the internship placement as a pedagogical tool, students will act as critical academic researchers in identifying an issue within the work placement environment and developing an effective research methodology to investigate this problematic. In so doing, students will derive a deeper understanding of the reflexive learning that an academically framed work experience engenders.

Through this process, which is supported initially by peer discussion, the construction of journal entries and a proposal presentation, students will develop verbal and written communication skills, along with the ability to apply critical research skills to practical issues outside of the university environment.

Concurrently and culminating in a 4000-5000/3000 - 3500 word research paper, students will meet with a designated Academic Supervisor.

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