Phil McClure

Professor / Chair, Physical Therapy

Room 216 Health Science Center 1 (215) 572-2863

About Me

Philip McClure, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Chair, Department of Physical Therapy, Professor of Physical Therapy received a Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy from Temple University, a Master of Science degree in Orthopedic Physical Therapy from the Medical College of Virginia and a PhD in Biomedical Science from Drexel University.

A professor of Physical Therapy at Arcadia since 1998, Dr. McClure directed the University’s highly successful transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy program for 14 years prior to becoming Chair of the Department of Physical Therapy. Dr. McClure’s research centers on the biomechanics of the shoulder and his work includes both laboratory and clinical studies. The broad goals of his research are to understand mechanisms underlying shoulder dysfunction and to develop interventions to optimize shoulder function after injury. He has published more than 60 peer-reviewed papers in highly regarded clinical and scientific journals and has presented research nationally and internationally on more than 100 occasions. Dr. McClure has earned several national professional awards, including selection as a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the APTA, the National Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Orthopedic Section of the APTA, and the Baethke-Carlin National Award for Excellence in Academic Teaching from the APTA.

In July 2014, Dr. McClure was awarded a four-year grant worth $1.9 million from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, a division of the NIH. He will serve as co-investigator to study shoulder muscle activation patterns in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, as well as the effects of both pain and exercise on these patterns.

Areas Of Focus

Shoulder Biomechanics, Rotator Cuff Dysfunction

Education History

Drexel University 1996

PhD, Major in Biomedical Science

Medical College of Virginia 1987

MS, Major in Orthopedic Physical Therapy

Temple University 1982

BS, Major in Physical Therapy

Research Summary

Dr. McClure’s research centers on the biomechanics of the shoulder and his work includes both laboratory and clinical studies. The broad goals of his research are to understand mechanisms underlying shoulder dysfunction and to develop interventions to optimize shoulder function after injury. He has published more than 60 peer-reviewed papers in highly regarded clinical and scientific journals and has presented research nationally and internationally on more than 100 occasions.  His work has centered around a two primary themes, scapular motion assessment and rotator cuff tendinopathy.

Dr. McClure has been studying scapular motion since the mid 1990's and has used different types of 3-dimensional assessment and more recently has explored and validated visual assessments suitable for routine clinical use.  basic biomechanical features as well as the relationships between scapular motion, pain and pathology have been studied as well as the effects of posture and exercise.

He has also studied rotator cuff tendinopathy, so-called "impingement syndrome"  since the 1990's and has explored basic mechanisms associated with impingement as well as the effects of exercise and manual therapy.  He has been involved in a large clinical study funded by the National Athletic Trainer's Association exploring the effects of a standardized exercise program with manual therapy in an effort to predict which patients will respond to rehabilitation.  In July 2014, Dr. McClure was awarded a four-year grant worth $1.9 million from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, a division of the NIH. He will serve as co-investigator and collaborate with Dr. Andrew Karduna at University of Oregon to study shoulder muscle activation patterns in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, as well as the effects of both pain and exercise on these patterns.