40 Under 40: Kim Jacoby Morris ’10

by Andrea Walls on May 9, 2020

40 Under 40: Kim Jacoby Morris ’10

by Andrea Walls on May 9, 2020

KIM JACOBY MORRIS ’10

Age 31

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry, concentration in Chemistry Chemical Professions

Post-doctoral fellow and chemist at the National Institute of Health

Education Specialist in the Education and Community Involvement Branch at the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health

Bethesda, Md.

Kim Jacoby Morris

Experiencing the World

Arcadia gave me the opportunity to explore change-making and global citizenship. Studying abroad was my first experience traveling outside of the United States and meeting people from diverse backgrounds. Listening and learning about other perspectives gave me insight and direction for navigating the world. Now, my career focuses on community engagement and education programming. I am actively involved in outreach, recruitment, and retention in science education programming. My personal goal is to increase access to education so that folks can make informed decisions about the way science intersects with their daily lives. My goals stem from the positive, enriching education I received from Arcadia. In short, without Arcadia, I would not be where I am today. 

Nostalgic Memories 

I will always cherish moving into my first apartment in Oak Summit Apartments. My roommate, who I met during the First-Year Study Abroad Experience, and I thrifted furniture and flexed our creativity to make the space our own. Moving there felt like the first step towards independence and thinking of it is nostalgic. We still keep in contact with friends we made in the building. 

Life is a Journey 

Be open to opportunities and follow the path that life takes you down. You never know who you might meet or where you’ll go. An equally important lesson, which folks forget to tell you, is that it is okay to try things and learn that you don’t enjoy it as much as you thought you would.
 

My personal goal is to increase access to education so that folks can make informed decisions about the way science intersects with their daily lives.

- KIM JACOBY MORRIS ’10