Dina B. Pinsky

Associate Professor, Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice

Easton 338 (215) 572-8544

About Me

Dina Pinsky is the director of the Sociology Program and the coordinator of the Gender and Sexuality Studies minor.  A specialist in digital sociology, gender and sexuality, and qualitative research methods, Professor Pinsky is the author of Jewish Feminists and recent articles on digitally mediated relationships, qualitative research methods, and sex work.  She is currently writing a book about how high school and college students use digital technologies to flirt.  At Arcadia, Professor Pinsky teaches Introductory Sociology, Research Methods, Writing for Social Sciences, Empirical Capstone Seminar, as well as a variety of topical courses. 

Areas Of Focus

digital sociology, gender and sexuality, qualitative research methods

Education History

Graduate Center, City University of New York 2002

Ph.D. in Sociology and Certificate in Women’s Studies

Barnard College, Columbia University 1994

B.A., Major in Sociology

Publications

Author 2019

Doing gender online through flirtation: Digitally mediated romantic interactions among college students

Article, Reset: Social Science Research on the Internet

Author 2013

“The Sustained Snapshot: Incidental Ethnographic Encounters in Qualitative Interview Studies”

Article, Qualitative Research 15(3):281-295

co-author 2015

“‘A World Turned Upside Down’: Emotional Labour and the Professional Dominatrix”

Article, Sexualities 18(4):438-458.

Co-Authored with Tania Levey

co-author 2015

“A Constellation of Stigmas: Complicating Sex Work Stigma with the Case of the Professional Dominatrix”

Article, Deviant Behavior 36(5):347-367

Co-Authored with Tania Levey

Author 2010

Jewish Feminists: Complex Identities and Activist Lives

Book, University of Illinois Press

Research Summary

Dr. Dina Pinsky's current research project, "Flirtation 2.0" is an ethnographic study of adolescent peer interactions as mediated through social media. Using feminist and symbolic-interactionist frameworks, Dr. Pinsky explores narratives about on-line flirting and analyzes new social codes for digital interaction embedded in gender ideologies. Her forthcoming book details the ever widening place flirtation occupies in the cultural consciousness of young people. Dr. Pinsky's previous research has focused on sex work stigma, Jewish feminist activists, and ethnographic research methodologies.